Workshop Presenter Spotlight: Giving Back in Korea

Shannon Heit has been living in Seoul, South Korea for almost six years. She is currently finishing her M.A. in Anthropology at Hanyang University. While in Korea, she has had many diverse opportunities – such as studying Korean, working as an English teacher, an English editor, an Eng/Kor translator and interpreter, and a reporter for both newspaper and radio. Among all of these experiences, the most valuable have been (by far) her volunteer experiences at the Korean Unwed Mothers’ Families Association (KUMFA) and the House of Sharing International Outreach Team – reformed and now called the Women’s Global Solidarity Action Network (WGSAN).

WGSAN has been working in conjunction with various Korean organizations on the issue of sexual slavery by the Japanese military during the Asia-Pacific war and the way the “Comfort Women” issue connects to modern issues such as current forms of sexual slavery, human trafficking, and women’s oppression on a global scale. This workshop will outline the history behind the “Comfort Women” issue, as well as discuss the ways that organizations in Korea are working together to solve this issue, as well as similar contemporary issues. The purpose of this workshop is to show adoptees the steps to get involved with Korean organizations, as well as some of the experiences that adoptees can expect when volunteering in Korea.

“During the workshop I will also describe some of my experiences as an adoptee working alongside the surviving Halmonis, other activists, and Korean organizations.”

“I hope to show ways that adoptees can connect in meaningful ways with Korean society.”

Shannon is currently volunteering for the Korean Unwed Mothers’ Families Association and Women’s Global Solidarity Action Network

Advertisements

About Adoptee Solidarity Korea

ASK's mission is to effect change in Korean adoption policy and practice. Through education, research, and advocacy we aim to strengthen our community and create a space for critical dialogue.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: